Ron Santo’s Death – Cause and Date

Born (Birthday)

February 25, 1940

Death Date

Dec 3, 2010

Age of Death

70 years

Cause of Death

Diabetes

Place of Death

Scottsdale, Arizona, United States

Profession

Baseball Player

The baseball player Ron Santo died at the age of 70. Here is all you want to know, and more!

Biography - A Short Wiki

Chicago Cubs Hall of Fame third baseman who played in nine All-Star games, and later become a famous sportscaster.

He signed with the Cubs in 1959, and played most of his career as a Cub, until he was traded to the White Sox towards the end of his career.

He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame posthumously in 2012.

He had four kids with his wife Vicky Santo, named Jeff, Ron Jr., Linda, and Kelly.

He and Ernie Banks were both longtime Cubs who were later inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame.

How did Ron Santo die?

Santo died at 12:40 am on December 3, 2010 in a hospital in Scottsdale, Arizona, due to complications from bladder cancer and diabetes.

Quotes

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The last thing I want is to die and then be put into the Hall of Fame. It’s not because I won’t be there to enjoy it, exactly. It’s because I want to enjoy it with family and friends and fans. I want to see them enjoy it.

Ron Santo
"

Every player had a roommate for out-of-town games, so I had to slip into the bathroom early each morning and secretly take my insulin injection. I feared that if the Cubs found out and I slumped badly, they would attribute it to the diabetes and send me back to the minors – or worse, release me.

Ron Santo
"

I was diagnosed with diabetes at age 18. I didn’t know what it was, so I went to the library and looked it up.

Ron Santo
"

I’ve been a Cub all my life. I came up here when I was 20 years old and spent my whole career here in Chicago. I’ve always been an optimist; I believe you have to be in order to survive, to be honest with you – in health, with what I’ve been through. That’s the way I am.

Ron Santo
"

I’m the perfect candidate to be affected by SARS. I’m highly susceptible to infections.

Ron Santo